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20121129
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with small business owners across the country to force the president to back down on raising taxes on the wealthy. former florida governor jeb bush is gathering policy experts and dedication leader's fourth annual education summit. we covered yesterday's events pick. that's where we begin. mr. bush says the unions are barriers to better schools. how would you fix your school system? we want to get your take on it. also, send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with the "washington times headline" -- we want to show you what the former florida governor had to say at yesterday's event. [video clip] >> we need to have a teacher evaluation system that is based on teachers being professionals and not part of some collective trade union bargaining process. we have a system to reward teachers based on an industrial and unionized model that is completely inappropriate for the 21st century, completely inappropriate. there are incredibly fine teachers that get paid less even though they are doing the lord's work consistently over time and there are tea
willingness to help the republicans the gate the pledge not to raise taxes by letting it expire and than any tax change to reduce taxes will be a tax cut, we will be glad to sign it. all of the super rich people who are now going to face the state tax on anything over $1 billion will be screening of their shoulders, the thing it. and rear not point to have $200 billion less in spending if after january 1 we sign a new tax bill. the fact that obama is administration is to make it sound like he is averting a catastrophe over the post 2013 -- it is an insult to people who know what is going on. host: if you think that -- do you think the president is not holding from one democratic beliefs? calving i really do not know. i just found out that ed rendell is supposedly a little type of democrat. he is one -- on one of these teams trying to figure out entitlements. this is a simple equation. we have about $800 billion more than necessary in spending. we have $800 billion more in spending that goes into the pockets of those who run unnecessary tests, insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies.
-- host: welcome to "washington journal." of the senate host: an increase in payroll taxes and the scheduled spending cuts across the board. a couple republicans yesterday signaled they could be flexible on the anti-tax pledge that they signed if it gets them closer to a deal with the white house. what is your reaction? here are the numbers to call. you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join us on facebook. you can also e-mail us. here's "usa today" looking at what happened on the sunday talk shows. it says -- the south carolina senator became the second republican senator in recent days to back away from a no tax pledge devised in the decades ago. the willingness to break ranks could prove crucial as gop leaders and democrats try to reach a deal before taxing and spending changes take effect in january. new york representative king says economic conditions have changed since the anti-tax pledge first emerged. he's a republican. that thee gop's say fiscal cliff deal is what defined grover norquist. let's hear congressman pete king of new york, a republican. he was
made it clear that when we get through the tax and job discussion in the congress he was to prioritize comprehensive immigration reform. he sees it as a key part to stabilizing the economy, investing in the middle class, not having a subclass of 11 million people that hurt economic revitalization. for him i think it is a piece of the middle class agenda. >> are the other unions working with senator schuman who say they are starting to work on a piece of legislation? >> the majority leader and center schumer. we have some issues with this idea, but we applaud his enthusiasm. we are trying to get him on the steps of key elements that are important to us. >> where do you disagree? >> i think he thinks a national id card is required. we do nothing that needs to be part of the solution to fixing the broken immigration system. >> washington journal continues. host:jim martin n. he will be talking about the future of health care, especially the elements of the affordable care act that are put to place. guest: glad to be here. host: what does it mean in general for older americans now that th
arguments that were made. host: you would agree to raise taxes then? caller: absolutely. host: ray in arlington, texas, independent. caller: good morning. who says gridlock is bad? i am in favor of gridlock. it keeps the government out of my business. i like the previous caller's suggestion on referendum. when the constitution was passed, i can understand the power of the legislature. but today i think any law passed by the legislature should be turned into a referendum and voted on by all of us with on- line computers and free long- distance phone calls. let the people speak approval of what the congress passes or veto it. host: do you think enough people would get involved in the state conversation like that? caller: i do, on the issues they are passing now in congress, like spending, spending what they don't have. they're spending my money. the obamacare would never have passed in front of the american people when it was originally proposed and passed by a democratic house and executive branch. i think we have a runaway government that is in too much of my daily living and busin
to tackle the tough fiscal cliff and make decisions about taxes, spending, and budget cuts. states are looking at how they can be affected. a question for you this morning, whether states should have a say in budget talks. here are the numbers to call. if you can also find us online. here is the headline in "the new york times." the pew center has a new study out called "the impact on the fiscal cliff on states." here is what it says. we would do more into these and how they will specifically affect states on an individual basis. there is a question on whether the fiscal cliff would hurt. it says -- our question for you this morning is whether the states should have a stake of in negotiations. looking more in the story "the new york times." it says -- some of the benefits states could receive, nobody is retained that president obama and republicans in congress will fail to reach an accord because they feel -- they fear that the resulting combination of spending cuts and tax increases could prompt another recession, which their states can ill afford. let's go to houston, texas and h
cliff, i was wondering about maybe raising taxes. q. what are they planning on cutting? i live paycheck to paycheck. i was curious as to what people are planning on cutting instead of just raising taxes? host: you said you are living paycheck to paycheck. are you doing anything to prepare in case the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? caller: just try to work to make a living. this economy is not helping much. host: thank you. today's wall street journal talks a little bit about the impact of going off the fiscal cliff in this chart -- we will take you through few more those scenarios throughout the show. but we want to go to jeff from texas, the independent line. your confidence in the u.s. economy as we are approaching this fiscal cliff. caller: yes, thank you. i don't see much confidence. i don't see the fiscal cliff as the big problem. the problem is the federal reserve monetary policy. the idea that the weekend keep printing money and borrowing money and expect the government to carry everything. we are buying up all these bonds and keeping interest rates so low. politicians from both
. 42% thought the obama administration would be able to do that in 2008. avoid raising taxes. control illegal immigration. heal political divisions in this country. 54% thought so in 2008. bob in north carolina on are democrats' line. you are up next. caller: i just think it is going to be better coming up this next time because i believe obama it did need a second chance. i voted for him. i am a native american and i lived on a cherokee indian reservation. we have to balance our budget. our leaders serve four years just like the president does. we make our budget work. if we don't have the money, we don't do it. that is all i got to tell you. host: jacqueline pata is going to be on later in this program. how would you describe the conditions where you live? caller: we have a heritage casino down here and it does a lot for us. we send all of our kids to college. we pay for it all. they can go to college anywhere in the united states. host: indian gaming has helped urination? caller: very much. host: are independent line, you are up next. what is your optimism level? caller: i am not o
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8